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any poker players here?

escortsxxx

Well-known member
Jul 15, 2004
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Thought about doing poker on line a few times
 
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fall

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2010
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I don't play online, the number of real vs fake players and algorithms has an effect on the outcome vs real life playing and deck shuffling. Also when you play without stakes vs playing using your own $$ online the algorithm is different and the house has the clear advantage in the long run.

When I play I don't always know my opponent and if I do I'm not sure their mindset. I consider myself above average given my years of play and knowledge but I don't let my opponents know this until I have to. But many times when I play with friends they already know so it's already on the table but sometimes people don't like to lose.

VBB
If you are playing poker against the house, it is a crooked casino and/or you are not playing poker :)
 

LawR

New member
Jul 21, 2021
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I really love playing poker. I played a lot offline and then transitioned to online gambling (partly due to the start of the covid pandemic). My ex didn’t approve of it (even though I was mostly coming out even, other times I was winning, I never lost money there) so she unwillingly put me on Gam Stop. For some time I had to play on these websites https://pick7.bet/betting-sites-not-on-gamstop and I have to say I’m really liking it. Even though the communities aren’t as big as in casinos like PokerStars, it's still fun and there are opportunities to win money (nothing crazy tho, I have never won big). Don’t even feel like coming back to the other casinos lol. Now that the situation with the pandemic has calmed down, I play mostly offline anyway.
 
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Birdenthusiast

New member
Oct 13, 2021
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Playing poker online and once a week at casinos got me through my 20's lol

And then everyone's game really improved and mine kind of stagnated and the games were much harder to beat

So I had to get a real job in my 30's lol 😆
 
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downbound123

Well-known member
Jul 10, 2017
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The one thing I have learned after years of playing is don't ever confuse luck for skill, it will get you into a lot of hurt.
 

rhuarc29

Well-known member
Apr 15, 2009
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I paid part of my university tuition playing poker. Started with only $50 online, not expecting to make anything with it, but ended up accumulating over $1200 in the span of a few months, playing low stakes. That gave me the confidence to try my hand at live games. First night I turned my $60 buy-in into $220. Second night I turned $100 into $650.

Played off and on during my university days and probably made close to $5000 profit (I wasn't tracking at first, so hard to know exactly).

But in my fourth year, I was playing a game with a real fish. I had turned my $100 buy-in into $350 by the time he sat down at our $1/$2 table. He was some rich moron who played terribly, super aggressive, and multiple people at the table had already taken his whole stack when I finally lucked out and faced him. He raised to $8, which he did every hand. It was folded around to me on the button, and I was sitting with K/Q of spades, raising to $24. Everyone else folded, and fish raised to $50. Typically he did such small raises when he wasn't confident in his hand, but wanted to bully anyway, so I went over the top to $150. He agonized over that for almost two minutes, then called.

Flop was K-9-3, with the 9 of spades. He thought about it for about 30 seconds, then checked. Given his play style, I put him on 10/9 or 9/8, possibly suited, but board was rainbow anyway. He would have bet the flop with Kings, or two pair. And he wouldn't have taken so long to check if he had nothing. I was certain I had him beat, and the pot was north of $300, with $200 left in my stack, and he was sitting at $150, so I put him all in. He stalled for almost 2 minutes again, then called.

I wanted to flip my cards immediately, but the jackass refused. Turn was an 8. River a deuce. Turn card made me nervous, and for good reason, because he had 9/8.

That kind of soiled me on the prospect, so I stopped going. Then I soon lost interest in ever going back, because I was busy. In the long run, I always came out ahead, but I had enough of the random bad beats.
 

superstar_88

The Chiseler
Jan 4, 2008
4,289
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You consider yourself a poker player and this one meaningless beat haunts you for your whole life? He had 5 cards to beat you with 2 cards to come. That's roughly 20% odds. You weren't a slam dunk to win and this is all you can come up with? Come on man. A straight flush over quads is a bad beat. You've never hit a card where you were only 20% or less to win?
 
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fall

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2010
2,144
408
83
I paid part of my university tuition playing poker. Started with only $50 online, not expecting to make anything with it, but ended up accumulating over $1200 in the span of a few months, playing low stakes. That gave me the confidence to try my hand at live games. First night I turned my $60 buy-in into $220. Second night I turned $100 into $650.

Played off and on during my university days and probably made close to $5000 profit (I wasn't tracking at first, so hard to know exactly).

But in my fourth year, I was playing a game with a real fish. I had turned my $100 buy-in into $350 by the time he sat down at our $1/$2 table. He was some rich moron who played terribly, super aggressive, and multiple people at the table had already taken his whole stack when I finally lucked out and faced him. He raised to $8, which he did every hand. It was folded around to me on the button, and I was sitting with K/Q of spades, raising to $24. Everyone else folded, and fish raised to $50. Typically he did such small raises when he wasn't confident in his hand, but wanted to bully anyway, so I went over the top to $150. He agonized over that for almost two minutes, then called.

Flop was K-9-3, with the 9 of spades. He thought about it for about 30 seconds, then checked. Given his play style, I put him on 10/9 or 9/8, possibly suited, but board was rainbow anyway. He would have bet the flop with Kings, or two pair. And he wouldn't have taken so long to check if he had nothing. I was certain I had him beat, and the pot was north of $300, with $200 left in my stack, and he was sitting at $150, so I put him all in. He stalled for almost 2 minutes again, then called.

I wanted to flip my cards immediately, but the jackass refused. Turn was an 8. River a deuce. Turn card made me nervous, and for good reason, because he had 9/8.

That kind of soiled me on the prospect, so I stopped going. Then I soon lost interest in ever going back, because I was busy. In the long run, I always came out ahead, but I had enough of the random bad beats.
One think made me suspicions of your story: he called you, so, you are the one to show your card first. And, after you show the winning hand, why did he showed his cards? In my experience, people like him do not show their cards at the end (or, at most, show just one)
 

fall

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2010
2,144
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When I think about it, this is my my most satisfying experience:

I was playing 1-2 for about 6 hours well into the night, I got moderately lucky that time and was sitting on something around $800 (I think, the max buy-in was $200) when a really drunk guy sat at the table. He was playing loose and I took a small pot from him (under $100). He was rude commenting on my weight and I was calmly calling him a drunk. Well, I was ready to leave, had my chips in the tray and my last hand under the gun was QQ. I did not want to risk and just wanted to get whatever little money I can from that hand, but he was the only guy who called. I have no idea what he had, I guess AJ or KJ since the flop showed a Jack and he called all my raises until I was able to milk all the $300 he had in front of him. Not the biggest hand I won, but it was my most satisfying moment to get the money from that asshole. He did not rebuy.
 

black booty lover

Well-known member
Oct 21, 2007
8,008
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You consider yourself a poker player and this one meaningless beat haunts you for your whole life? He had 5 cards to beat you with 2 cards to come. That's roughly 20% odds. You weren't a slam dunk to win and this is all you can come up with? Come on man. A straight flush over quads is a bad beat. You've never hit a card where you were only 20% or less to win?
Yeah I was thinking something similar. Bad beats are part of poker. It happens all the time, especially in lower stakes because people will play anything and luck out here and there.

 

versitile1

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2013
2,025
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I made some okay scores playing online tourneys, buy-ins usually around $22 USD. $2100, $1800 a couple of times, and a few smaller ones. The pay structure is really top heavy, so it’s almost a waste of time if you don’t final table, which can take anywhere from several hours to days in the big tournaments.

I play cash games (live) too, although not in a while. Usually $1/$2 NL and $2/$5 NL. Made a few big pots but nothing crazy. Never been to Vegas to play poker but wanna give it a go with a decent bankroll just to see what happens.
 

rhuarc29

Well-known member
Apr 15, 2009
8,883
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One think made me suspicions of your story: he called you, so, you are the one to show your card first. And, after you show the winning hand, why did he showed his cards? In my experience, people like him do not show their cards at the end (or, at most, show just one)
I'm not sure you understood my retelling. I went all in on the flop, he called. I asked if he wanted to flip (before the remaining cards were dealt). He said no. So we didn't actually see each other's cards until after the river. He sucked out on the turn.
 

fall

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2010
2,144
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I'm not sure you understood my retelling. I went all in on the flop, he called. I asked if he wanted to flip (before the remaining cards were dealt). He said no. So we didn't actually see each other's cards until after the river. He sucked out on the turn.
My question is: why did he show his cards at all? Poker players rarely show losing hand even after the river. And you were required to show your hand first (since he called you), so, after he see you have the winning hand, he does not have to show his cards (and, again, almost noone shows his cards in his situation). Also, after no more action is possible (all people are all in and called), any player can show his cards: he does not need a permission from others.
 
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