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Thread: Al Kaline RIP

  1. #49
    There seems to be quite some affinity for Al Kaline among members of a certain generation. Before baseball in Canada and Toronto, were the Detroit Tigers popular in Ontario?

  2. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by WyattEarp View Post
    There seems to be quite some affinity for Al Kaline among members of a certain generation. Before baseball in Canada and Toronto, were the Detroit Tigers popular in Ontario?
    Yes, the Tigers were very popular in the Windsor, Essex County, Kent County area. Prior to the Expos and Blue Jays, there was nothing else. Tiger Stadium was ten minute ride on the tunnel bus from downtown Windsor, a wave through at US Customs, get back on the tunnel bus to Kennedy Square, stop in front of the National Bank of Detroit and a fifteen minute walk to the ballpark along Michigan Avenue. Tickets were $4 maximum for box seats and $1 for the bleachers. We usually got reserved lower deck seats for $3.50.

    I liked most of the Tigers, especially Earl Wilson and Mickey Lolich. They were true gentlemen. I hated Denny McLain, especially after he was banned for a while for gambling by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. He was a thoughtless self-centred clod who pulled mean pranks in the dressing room. Later in life, he served two terms in Federal Prison and even got recharged with his buddy, John Gotti, Jr, for telephone ripoffs while still in the Pen. Some years later, while chatting with Earl Wilson one day, he indicated that he, and many of the other Tigers, did not like McLain at all and that "he was not a nice man." We were friends. I miss Earl Wilson.

    Also, the Red Wings were very popular in Windsor. There was a great rivalry with Leaf fans, and one bar in Windsor even flew both Red Wing and Maple Leaf banners. It was a friendly rivalry.

    I was partial to the Red Wings, after meeting many of them personally and helping them with their tax situations.

  3. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Some years later, while chatting with Earl Wilson one day, he indicated that he, and many of the other Tigers, did not like McLain at all and that "he was not a nice man." We were friends. I miss Earl Wilson.
    What I love about Earl Wilson was that he was a power-hitting pitcher. He had 35 home runs, 111 RBI's in 740 at-bats.

  4. #52
    He was also a nice humble down to earth guy. After retirement, he opened an engine rebuilding business in Detroit. He was a real gentleman. He had a 20 game season in 1967 and was called upon to pinch hit, due to his hitting prowess.

  5. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    and was called upon to pinch hit, due to his hitting prowess.
    Don Drysdale and Gary Peters were also good hitting pitcher. I remember one time Drysdale won a game 1-0. He hit the home run for the one run.

  6. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Darts View Post
    Don Drysdale and Gary Peters were also good hitting pitcher. I remember one time Drysdale won a game 1-0. He hit the home run for the one run.
    Batters could not dig in against the late Don Drysdale. He was particularly mean when he pitched and would not have a problem plunking you with a fast ball. I recall following him and Bob Gibson as they both vied for the Cy Young in 1968. Both of them had substantial shutout streaks of 50+ innings during the year, later to be copied and bested by Orel Hershiser over twenty years later. Gibson was best with a miniscule 1.12 ERA pitching over 300 innings and a 22 win season with 28 complete games in 34 starts and leading the league with 268 Ks. I often wondered how he lost 9 games in 1968. Drysdale, playing for the punchless Dodgers, had a 2.15 ERA but could only manage 14 wins. I thought that, with a better team, 1968 should have been a 20 game season for him. Drysdale pitched for one more year and retired in 1969 at 32. Gibson retired several years later. Both are in the Hall of Fame.

  7. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Batters could not dig in against the late Don Drysdale. He was particularly mean when he pitched and would not have a problem plunking you with a fast ball.
    Here's a Don Drysdale story. The manager came to the mound and instructed Drysdale to issue an intentional walk. As the manager was walking back to the dugout he heard an awful scream. The manager turned around and asked Drydale what happened? Drysdale said he hit
    the batter with one pitch because he didn't want to throw 4 pitches when one would do.

    P.S. Any moment now, Shack and/or George will say that this is a thread about Kaline and not about Drysdale.

  8. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Darts View Post
    Here's a Don Drysdale story. The manager came to the mound and instructed Drysdale to issue an intentional walk. As the manager was walking back to the dugout he heard an awful scream. The manager turned around and asked Drydale what happened? Drysdale said he hit
    the batter with one pitch because he didn't want to throw 4 pitches when one would do.

    P.S. Any moment now, Shack and/or George will say that this is a thread about Kaline and not about Drysdale.
    /Attempted Hijacking, but I'll play....

    You write that Drysdale threw a pitch as the manager was walking back to the dugout?

    I don't believe you.

    Mr. Drysdale may have hit the batter on the 1st pitch following the mound visit, but unlikely the batter would emit an awful scream.
    The umpire would not have signaled 'play ball', allowing play to resume after timeout was called when the manager (I'll guess Walter Alston) 1st entered the field of play. Resumption of play would is extremely unlikely to have occurred until the manager was safely back in the dugout.

    Documentation, please.

  9. #57
    Continuing with Don Drysdale. In those days of yore, athletes would often appear as cameos on various tv shows and commercials of the era. Extra money was important when you were not making a whole lot more than the average fan. Willie Mays and Don Drysdale (twice) appeared on the Donna Reed Show as themselves. The plot was paper thin. Jeff Stone (Paul Peterson) wanted to quit school to become a ball player. Donna Stone (Donna Reed) and her husband, Dr Stone (Carl Betz) colluded with the ballplayers to discourage him. I remember the look on Paul Peterson's face when he caught a Drysdale fastball, to which Willie Mays retorted, "Sponge." Paul nodded and slipped the sponge into his glove. He landed up using two sponges. It was a funny episode. I haven't seen it since the sixties.
    Don also won $75 on Groucho Marx's show, "You Bet Your Life," with his wife as contestants. Strangely, I recall Whitey Ford hawking Camel cigarettes in a tv commercial, when cigarette advertising was prevalent on the tube. In fact, Johnny Carson and his guests used to smoke on his late night show.

  10. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Continuing with Don Drysdale. In those days of yore, athletes would often appear as cameos on various tv shows and commercials of the era. Extra money was important when you were not making a whole lot more than the average fan. Willie Mays and Don Drysdale (twice) appeared on the Donna Reed Show as themselves. The plot was paper thin. Jeff Stone (Paul Peterson) wanted to quit school to become a ball player. Donna Stone (Donna Reed) and her husband, Dr Stone (Carl Betz) colluded with the ballplayers to discourage him. I remember the look on Paul Peterson's face when he caught a Drysdale fastball, to which Willie Mays retorted, "Sponge." Paul nodded and slipped the sponge into his glove. He landed up using two sponges. It was a funny episode. I haven't seen it since the sixties.
    Don also won $75 on Groucho Marx's show, "You Bet Your Life," with his wife as contestants. Strangely, I recall Whitey Ford hawking Camel cigarettes in a tv commercial, when cigarette advertising was prevalent on the tube. In fact, Johnny Carson and his guests used to smoke on his late night show.
    You saying reminded of an episode of Bewitched in which I remembered Jack Snow of the L.A. Rams making a cameo as himself. I wasn't sure if I was right or not so I looked him up on Wiki and sure enough it mentioned there. Good call on why that was happening in that era. I never considered that.

  11. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Goddamn it, you assholes! This thread was about Al Kaline passing on. Let's stick to the subject, Al Kaline.
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Batters could not dig in against the late Don Drysdale. He was particularly mean when he pitched and would not have a problem plunking you with a fast ball. I recall following him and Bob Gibson as they both vied for the Cy Young in 1968. Both of them had substantial shutout streaks of 50+ innings during the year, later to be copied and bested by Orel Hershiser over twenty years later. Gibson was best with a miniscule 1.12 ERA pitching over 300 innings and a 22 win season with 28 complete games in 34 starts and leading the league with 268 Ks. I often wondered how he lost 9 games in 1968. Drysdale, playing for the punchless Dodgers, had a 2.15 ERA but could only manage 14 wins. I thought that, with a better team, 1968 should have been a 20 game season for him. Drysdale pitched for one more year and retired in 1969 at 32. Gibson retired several years later. Both are in the Hall of Fame.
    Quote Originally Posted by bluecolt View Post
    Continuing with Don Drysdale. In those days of yore, athletes would often appear as cameos on various tv shows and commercials of the era. Extra money was important when you were not making a whole lot more than the average fan. Willie Mays and Don Drysdale (twice) appeared on the Donna Reed Show as themselves. The plot was paper thin. Jeff Stone (Paul Peterson) wanted to quit school to become a ball player. Donna Stone (Donna Reed) and her husband, Dr Stone (Carl Betz) colluded with the ballplayers to discourage him. I remember the look on Paul Peterson's face when he caught a Drysdale fastball, to which Willie Mays retorted, "Sponge." Paul nodded and slipped the sponge into his glove. He landed up using two sponges. It was a funny episode. I haven't seen it since the sixties.
    Don also won $75 on Groucho Marx's show, "You Bet Your Life," with his wife as contestants. Strangely, I recall Whitey Ford hawking Camel cigarettes in a tv commercial, when cigarette advertising was prevalent on the tube. In fact, Johnny Carson and his guests used to smoke on his late night show.
    I must have missed the Al Kaline references in your posts. Remember, this thread is about him. Not Donna Reed or Groucho Marx. Glad you brought him up, though, my all time favourite comedian and probably the most influential of all time. And actually, I remember hearing that Groucho was an Al Kaline fan.


  12. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by shack View Post
    I must have missed the Al Kaline references in your posts. Remember, this thread is about him. Not Donna Reed or Groucho Marx. Glad you brought him up, though, my all time favourite comedian and probably the most influential of all time. And actually, I remember hearing that Groucho was an Al Kaline fan.
    Oh the irony,lol...........But because Groucho was a Marx fan here is a very funny interview that he did with Dick Cavett. Just for Eddie

  13. #61
    If they do away with the 4 pitch intentional walk, they should call it the Drysdale rule.

    "pitchers could eliminate the intentional walk in other ways. If some pitcher wanted to channel their inner Don Drysdale or Old Hoss Radbourn and fire a pitch into the batter’s ribs, it would serve the same purpose."

    https://calltothepen.com/2017/02/22/...entional-walk/

  14. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by gcostanza View Post
    /Attempted Hijacking, but I'll play....

    You write that Drysdale threw a pitch as the manager was walking back to the dugout?

    I don't believe you.

    Mr. Drysdale may have hit the batter on the 1st pitch following the mound visit, but unlikely the batter would emit an awful scream.
    The umpire would not have signaled 'play ball', allowing play to resume after timeout was called when the manager (I'll guess Walter Alston) 1st entered the field of play. Resumption of play would is extremely unlikely to have occurred until the manager was safely back in the dugout.

    Documentation, please.
    Well, darty has replied to the thread, so has had opportunity to see this post.
    No proof that what he alleged actually occurred.

    George calls bullshit.

  15. #63
    Mike Shannon, who actually played MLB, said it happened.

    "Don Drysdale would consider an intentional walk a waste of three pitches. If he wants to put you on base, he can hit you with one pitch." - Mike Shannon"

    Drysdale holds or use to hold the record for most seasons leading the league in hit batters.

    "Don Drysdale holds the Major League record for seasons leading the league in batters hit by a pitch"

  16. #64
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    I may be wrong, but I'd always heard that the concept was attributed to Bob Gibson.

  17. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Darts View Post
    Mike Shannon, who actually played MLB, said it happened.

    "Don Drysdale would consider an intentional walk a waste of three pitches. If he wants to put you on base, he can hit you with one pitch." - Mike Shannon"

    Drysdale holds or use to hold the record for most seasons leading the league in hit batters.

    "Don Drysdale holds the Major League record for seasons leading the league in batters hit by a pitch"
    Mike Shannon said it happened while the Dodgers field manager was headed back to the dugout?

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