Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: 737 Max hearings - a HOLY FUCK moment...

  1. #1

    737 Max hearings - a HOLY FUCK moment...

    Peter Defazio, the chairman of the House Transportation Committee, said an FAA analysis following the Lion Air accident but before the Ethiopian Airlines crash concluded there would be 15 fatal MAX accidents if there was no fix to MCAS. DeFazio asked Dickson why wasn’t airplane grounded then? He did not have an answer.

    unreal!!!

    https://leehamnews.com/2019/12/11/fa...cas-not-fixed/

  2. #2
    These people knew in advance the problems with the 737 Max and ignorred fixing them. They've since paid a fine of some 3 million dollars. In the meantime almost 300 people died in the crash. And nobody goes to jail. America is officially the most corrupt Country on the planet. Close behind unfortunately is Canada. Pathetic.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sleazy View Post
    These people knew in advance the problems with the 737 Max and ignorred fixing them. They've since paid a fine of some 3 million dollars. In the meantime almost 300 people died in the crash. And nobody goes to jail. America is officially the most corrupt Country on the planet. Close behind unfortunately is Canada. Pathetic.

    No wonder you are such a conspiracy nutjob, conflating issues. You read headlines and then find conspiracy theories in everyday occurrences. The fine you claim "paid" has nothing to do with the MCAS system, it is for faulty flap tracks. And in fact the fine was only proposed. And it was $3.9M

    https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/...ng-faulty.html


    I agree that Boeing was ultimately responsible for these miscoated slat tracks being installed and signed off but third party parts sometime slip through all the processes designed to capture them, even when identified.



    WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a civil penalty of more than $3.9 million against The Boeing Co. for installing nonconforming components on approximately 133 aircraft, which Boeing subsequently presented as ready for airworthiness certification.

    The FAA alleges that Boeing failed to adequately oversee its suppliers to ensure they complied with the company’s quality assurance system. The agency contends that this failure resulted in the installation of slat tracks that were weakened by a condition known as hydrogen embrittlement that occurred during cadmium-titanium plating.

    Slat tracks are located on the leading edge of the wings of a Boeing 737 and are used to guide the movement of panels known as slats. These panels provide additional lift during takeoff and landing. The FAA further alleges that Boeing knowingly submitted aircraft for final FAA airworthiness certification after determining that the parts could not be used due to a failed strength test.

    The agency alleges that the affected slat tracks were processed by Southwest United Industries (SUI), a third-tier supplier to Boeing, on June 29, 2018. SUI subsequently shipped the parts to Spirit AeroSystems, Inc. (Spirit), which then delivered the parts to Boeing.

    The FAA also alleges that SUI notified Kencoa Aerospace, LLC, on July 6, 2018, that a batch of the slat tracks had failed a quality test indicating the presence of hydrogen embrittlement. Kencoa passed that information to Spirit on or about Aug. 3, 2018.

    The FAA alleges that Spirit informed Boeing of the situation on or about Sept. 11, 2018, and subsequently proposed that Boeing accept the parts as delivered. On Oct. 9, 2018, Boeing rejected that proposal and instructed Spirit to submit a Notice of Escapement. Spirit filed that notice on Feb. 14, 2019, according to documents.

    The FAA further alleges that from Aug. 16, 2018, through Oct. 9, 2018, Boeing certified approximately 48 aircraft potentially equipped with those slat tracks as airworthy. Between Oct. 10, 2018, and May 2, 2019, Boeing knowingly certified an additional 85 potentially affected aircraft as airworthy.

    The FAA issued an Airworthiness Directive (AD) on June 10, 2019, mandating inspections proposed in a Boeing service bulletin dated June 4, 2019, of the affected aircraft. The AD specified various actions based on the ability to identify the slat tracks.

    The FAA alleges that identification of the defective parts was hindered because SUI did not apply a protective coating over the part identification mark that is required to be displayed on the slat tracks. As a result, those part identification marks became either obscured or invisible, making it difficult to identify the affected parts.

    The FAA alleges that Boeing failed in this instance to maintain its quality assurance system to ensure suppliers adhered to Federal Aviation Regulations.
    Boeing has 30 days to respond to the FAA’s letter proposing this civil penalty in the total amount of $3,916,871.
    “... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance.”

    -Neil deGrasse Tyson

  4. #4
    Time for a regime change at Boeing.
    The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent anybody else.

  5. #5
    Mullenburger is history when the MAX is back in service. Its only fair he cleans up the mess before the next CEO takes over.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SchlongConery View Post
    No wonder you are such a conspiracy nutjob, conflating issues. You read headlines and then find conspiracy theories in everyday occurrences. The fine you claim "paid" has nothing to do with the MCAS system, it is for faulty flap tracks. And in fact the fine was only proposed. And it was $3.9M

    https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/...ng-faulty.html


    I agree that Boeing was ultimately responsible for these miscoated slat tracks being installed and signed off but third party parts sometime slip through all the processes designed to capture them, even when identified.



    WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a civil penalty of more than $3.9 million against The Boeing Co. for installing nonconforming components on approximately 133 aircraft, which Boeing subsequently presented as ready for airworthiness certification.

    The FAA alleges that Boeing failed to adequately oversee its suppliers to ensure they complied with the company’s quality assurance system. The agency contends that this failure resulted in the installation of slat tracks that were weakened by a condition known as hydrogen embrittlement that occurred during cadmium-titanium plating.

    Slat tracks are located on the leading edge of the wings of a Boeing 737 and are used to guide the movement of panels known as slats. These panels provide additional lift during takeoff and landing. The FAA further alleges that Boeing knowingly submitted aircraft for final FAA airworthiness certification after determining that the parts could not be used due to a failed strength test.

    The agency alleges that the affected slat tracks were processed by Southwest United Industries (SUI), a third-tier supplier to Boeing, on June 29, 2018. SUI subsequently shipped the parts to Spirit AeroSystems, Inc. (Spirit), which then delivered the parts to Boeing.

    The FAA also alleges that SUI notified Kencoa Aerospace, LLC, on July 6, 2018, that a batch of the slat tracks had failed a quality test indicating the presence of hydrogen embrittlement. Kencoa passed that information to Spirit on or about Aug. 3, 2018.

    The FAA alleges that Spirit informed Boeing of the situation on or about Sept. 11, 2018, and subsequently proposed that Boeing accept the parts as delivered. On Oct. 9, 2018, Boeing rejected that proposal and instructed Spirit to submit a Notice of Escapement. Spirit filed that notice on Feb. 14, 2019, according to documents.

    The FAA further alleges that from Aug. 16, 2018, through Oct. 9, 2018, Boeing certified approximately 48 aircraft potentially equipped with those slat tracks as airworthy. Between Oct. 10, 2018, and May 2, 2019, Boeing knowingly certified an additional 85 potentially affected aircraft as airworthy.

    The FAA issued an Airworthiness Directive (AD) on June 10, 2019, mandating inspections proposed in a Boeing service bulletin dated June 4, 2019, of the affected aircraft. The AD specified various actions based on the ability to identify the slat tracks.

    The FAA alleges that identification of the defective parts was hindered because SUI did not apply a protective coating over the part identification mark that is required to be displayed on the slat tracks. As a result, those part identification marks became either obscured or invisible, making it difficult to identify the affected parts.

    The FAA alleges that Boeing failed in this instance to maintain its quality assurance system to ensure suppliers adhered to Federal Aviation Regulations.
    Boeing has 30 days to respond to the FAA’s letter proposing this civil penalty in the total amount of $3,916,871.
    Bullshit. They farmed out the software design to India for $9.00/hr. And people died because of their negligence. People need to start going to jail for this crap. I used to sell electronic componets to the Aerospace Industry. The rigorous procedures that existed before the the mid 90's NEVER would have allowed this disaster to happen. Boeing was a flagship American Company for decades. They put profits and share buybacks ahead of safety...period. America has gone from an Industrial powerhouse to a Financialized Economy that produces little of value any longer. Boeing is the poster child for the hollowing out of America's Industry to a Financilaized house of cards. And when it collapses all the trolls here will be sleeping on the streets of LA, San Francisco, San Antonio, Portland like the rest of the homeless.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sleazy View Post
    Bullshit. They farmed out the software design to India for $9.00/hr. And people died because of their negligence. People need to start going to jail for this crap. I used to sell electronic componets to the Aerospace Industry. The rigorous procedures that existed before the the mid 90's NEVER would have allowed this disaster to happen. Boeing was a flagship American Company for decades. They put profits and share buybacks ahead of safety...period. America has gone from an Industrial powerhouse to a Financialized Economy that produces little of value any longer. Boeing is the poster child for the hollowing out of America's Industry to a Financilaized house of cards. And when it collapses all the trolls here will be sleeping on the streets of LA, San Francisco, San Antonio, Portland like the rest of the homeless.
    Exactly, Boeing spent $20B on stock buybacks and had no money for developing a new airplane to replace the old 737.
    The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent anybody else.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sleazy View Post
    Bullshit. They farmed out the software design to India for $9.00/hr.
    They do farm out coding to some Indian companies but not the design, nor the software related to MCAS.



    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sleazy View Post
    And people died because of their negligence. People need to start going to jail for this crap.

    They put profits and share buybacks ahead of safety...period.

    America has gone from an Industrial powerhouse to a Financialized Economy that produces little of value any longer. Boeing is the poster child for the hollowing out of America's Industry to a Financilaized house of cards

    I agree 100% with you here.
    “... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance.”

    -Neil deGrasse Tyson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •