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Thread: Liberals (Trudeau) block RCMP investigation of SNC Lavalin

  1. #25
    Well, this is a turn of events in the right direction at least. Or perhaps just due diligence on the RCMP's part to assuage the public from an optics stand-point:



    RCMP interviews Jody Wilson-Raybould to discuss political interference in SNC criminal prosecution

    Ms. Wilson-Raybould, seen here, told The Globe and Mail on Wednesday that RCMP officers from the national division in Ottawa had a formal interview with her in Vancouver on Tuesday.

    Justin Tang/The Canadian Press

    Former justice minister and attorney-general Jody Wilson-Raybould met with RCMP investigators this week to discuss political interference in the criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., and called on the Trudeau government to waive cabinet confidentiality for her and all other witnesses to allow a thorough probe into potential obstruction of justice.

    Ms. Wilson-Raybould told The Globe and Mail on Wednesday that RCMP officers from the national division in Ottawa, which handles sensitive political matters, had a formal interview with her in Vancouver on Tuesday.

    “I have had a meeting and I have been interviewed by the RCMP, and that meeting happened yesterday [Tuesday], and I am not going to comment any further on the nature of those conversations,” she said. “Of course I am concerned about the government’s decision to deny [the RCMP’s] request for access to other witnesses. As a matter of principle, the RCMP should be able to conduct thorough and necessary investigations.”

    Ms. Wilson-Raybould said the meeting was at the request of the RCMP after they had several telephone conversations with her following the release of a report from Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion in August.

    Mr. Dion said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and senior officials violated the Conflict of Interest Act by improperly pressing Ms. Wilson-Raybould to order the Public Prosecution Service to settle a fraud and bribery case against the Montreal-based engineering and construction giant.

    Ms. Wilson-Raybould spoke to the RCMP last spring, but at the time said she did not believe a crime had taken place. She now believes the case needs to be re-examined in light of Mr. Dion’s report.

    “I believe the public deserves to know and to have full knowledge of this matter,” Ms. Wilson-Raybould said.

    Mr. Dion said in his report that the government refused to waive cabinet confidentiality for nine witnesses who said they had relevant information about allegations of political interference in the SNC-Lavalin prosecution.

    The RCMP is facing the same situation as Mr. Dion did. The government says Privy Council Clerk Ian Shugart, who reports to Mr. Trudeau, will not waive cabinet confidentiality to allow the national police force to speak to witnesses and obtain cabinet documents relating to SNC-Lavalin.

    The Liberal Leader rejected a call from Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer on Wednesday to allow anyone with knowledge of the SNC-Lavalin matter to discuss it freely with the RCMP.

    Emerging from Rideau Hall after the issuing of the writs for a federal election on Oct. 21, Mr. Trudeau said the decision was Mr. Shugart’s alone.

    “We respect the decisions made by our professional public servants," he said. "We respect the decision made by the Clerk.”

    Mr. Scheer said in Trois-Rivières, Que., that it is within the power of the Prime Minister to offer a full waiver to the RCMP.

    “He is not telling the truth when he says that it is not his decision," Mr. Scheer said. "It is his decision. He has the power. He needs to stop hiding behind the Clerk of the Privy Council, take some responsibility, waive that privilege and let the RCMP do their job.”

    University of Ottawa law professor Yan Campagnolo said in an academic article on cabinet confidentiality that voluntary disclosure of cabinet documents must be “authorized by the Governor-in-council [cabinet] pursuant to the recommendation of the Prime Minister.”

    Former Liberal cabinet minister Jane Philpott, who stepped down after Ms. Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet over the SNC-Lavalin matter, said she would like to speak to the national police, but wants Mr. Trudeau to waive cabinet confidentiality.

    “From what I understand about the initiative that they are undertaking, I believe that I have information that would be relevant,” Ms. Philpott said in an interview. “It is information that is subject to cabinet confidentiality, and so I, of course, would need that to be waived in order to be able to speak with them.”

    The RCMP has not officially launched a criminal investigation. The force has said it is “examining this matter carefully with all available information.” It will pause the operation during the election campaign.

    Ms. Philpott and Ms. Wilson-Raybould are running as Independents. They were ejected from the Liberal caucus in April.

    Mr. Trudeau told reporters the government offered the “largest and most expansive waiver of cabinet confidence in Canada’s history.” An order in council dated Feb. 25 offered a waiver to Ms. Wilson-Raybould and “any persons who directly participated in discussions with her” about the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin during her time as attorney-general. She was moved to Veterans Affairs on Jan. 14.

    However, the public inquiry into the sponsorship scandal in 2004-2005 received unconditional access to hundreds of pages of cabinet documents and heard testimony from all the ministers involved in deliberations on the national-unity initiative.

    That inquiry’s final report said: “Ordinarily, cabinet deliberations are secret and privileged, but the government agreed to waive this privilege by two orders-in-council which permitted a full inquiry to be made of the question of how certain decisions were reached when the sponsorship program was first conceived.”

    Shortly after the release of the report into the sponsorship scandal in the fall of 2005, the minority government of Paul Martin was defeated in the House of Commons. Stephen Harper’s Conservative Party came to power after the general election of January, 2006.

    The Trudeau government’s waiver allowed Ms. Wilson-Raybould to talk to the House of Commons justice committee and the Ethics Commissioner, but did not extend to events after she was moved or discussions involving other individuals.

    The Ethics Commissioner found that a number of discussions between members of the Prime Minister’s Office, ministerial staffers and officials at SNC-Lavalin were conducted without Ms. Wilson-Raybould’s knowledge, and therefore were not covered by the waiver.

    A spokeswoman for the Liberal campaign, Zita Astravas, said the waiver in the SNC-Lavalin matter was unprecedented because the four other orders issued after 1987 did not include solicitor-client privilege. The attorney-general provides legal advice to the government, therefore such conversations are covered by solicitor-client privilege.

    Asked on Tuesday if she talked to the RCMP about discussions she had with Mr. Trudeau and his officials after she was shuffled out of the justice portfolio, a time frame for which she remains subject to cabinet confidentiality, Ms. Wilson-Raybould said: “I really can’t talk about discussions I had with the police.”

    Ms. Wilson-Raybould and Ms. Philpot also disputed Mr. Trudeau’s assertion that the Privy Council Clerk made the decision to deny the RCMP unfettered access to witnesses and cabinet documents.

    “The final decision in matters like this is in the hands of the Prime Minister,” Ms. Wilson-Raybould said.

    Ms. Philpott said: “The Clerk is responsible to the Prime Minister and he is there to advise the Prime Minister fearlessly, but also to loyally execute the wishes of the Prime Minister.”

    Section 139 of the Criminal Code states a person who “wilfully attempts in any manner to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice in a judicial proceeding” is guilty of obstruction of justice.

    NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said Mr. Trudeau is giving excuses while the RCMP is being denied access to information.

    “Canadians want to know the truth,” Mr. Singh said in London, Ont. “Right now, it seems that more and more barriers are being put up by the Prime Minister. He’s got to answer for that. I would hold a public inquiry. I would ensure that all the confidentiality was waived so that anyone who wants to come forward who has information about this scandal could come forward.”

    Mr. Scheer said the issue is not whether the SNC-Lavalin matter will affect public opinion polls but whether Mr. Trudeau deserves a second mandate in government.

    “We have been telling Canadians and showing Canadians how Justin Trudeau has consistently misled them," Mr. Scheer said. "He has lied, he has looked Canadians in the eye and said things that he knew were not true. We made the case he has lost the moral authority to govern. What today shows is that you just cannot trust Justin Trudeau. He will say anything to cover up his scandals and will say anything to get re-elected.”

    With a report from Kristy Kirkup

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/poli...-interference/
    "We are a generous and welcoming people here in the United States. But we simply cannot allow people to pour into the United States undetected, undocumented, unchecked, and circumventing the line of people who are waiting patiently, diligently and lawfully to become immigrants into this country." -- BARACK OBAMA

    ON IGNORE: FRANKFOOTER aka GROGGY aka FLUBADUB and who knows how many other handles banned for trolling/anti-Semitism.

  2. #26
    the RCMP are always trying to manipulate elections, its very disturbing. They are very anti-liberal and have already manipulated an election. JWR is breaking client-attorney privilage by meeting with them, she should be disbarred.

    There is ZERO chance the PM could be prosecuted successfully of this. He was not trying to defeat justice at all, but was rather suggesting an alternative legal mechanism for dealing with SNC.

  3. #27
    BTW its funny how the CONs cheer the RCMP in this case, then blame the PM for the Norman affair that was the result of sloppy work by the RCMP

  4. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by nottyboi View Post
    the RCMP are always trying to manipulate elections, its very disturbing. They are very anti-liberal and have already manipulated an election. JWR is breaking client-attorney privilage by meeting with them, she should be disbarred.

    There is ZERO chance the PM could be prosecuted successfully of this. He was not trying to defeat justice at all, but was rather suggesting an alternative legal mechanism for dealing with SNC.
    Yup. But that's why we have elections. To hold politicians accountable for their decisions.

    This isn't going away.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  5. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler1000 View Post
    Yup. But that's why we have elections. To hold politicians accountable for their decisions.

    This isn't going away.
    Of course it won't go away, its the closest you've got to a scandal.
    Which must really suck if you're a scheer supporter like yourself.

    Now Trump, those are some really juicy scandals.
    “To abandon facts is to abandon freedom. If nothing is true, then no one can criticize power, because there is no basis upon which to do so. If nothing is true, then all is spectacle

  6. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Frankfooter View Post
    Of course it won't go away, its the closest you've got to a scandal.
    Which must really suck if you're a scheer supporter like yourself.

    Now Trump, those are some really juicy scandals.
    It's a great clear cut scandal that clearly shows Trudeau lied on transparency and accountability. And is continuing Liberal party corruption.

    Taking the side of a bribing Multi National corporation? Who has also done the same on domestic Construction contracts as well?

    How Neo liberal of you.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  7. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by nottyboi View Post
    He was not trying to defeat justice at all, but was rather suggesting an alternative legal mechanism for dealing with SNC.
    LMAO.........That's your take eh?

  8. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler1000 View Post
    It's a great clear cut scandal that clearly shows Trudeau lied on transparency and accountability. And is continuing Liberal party corruption.

    Taking the side of a bribing Multi National corporation? Who has also done the same on domestic Construction contracts as well?

    How Neo liberal of you.
    SNC are being held to the law, the PM asked if the jobs merited more consideration and the AG made her independent decision that they should be held to the law.
    Big scandal.

    If that's the best you've got, give up.
    “To abandon facts is to abandon freedom. If nothing is true, then no one can criticize power, because there is no basis upon which to do so. If nothing is true, then all is spectacle

  9. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by HEYHEY View Post
    Isn't blocking the police from conducting an investigation called obstruction of justice?
    The PM wouldn't do that since he has repeatedly stated in public that Canada was a country of rule of law.

    His government is committed totally to Transparency. That was made pretty clear lol.


  10. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Frankfooter View Post
    SNC are being held to the law, the PM asked if the jobs merited more consideration and the AG made her independent decision that they should be held to the law.
    Big scandal.

    If that's the best you've got, give up.
    They actually changed the law specifically to help SNC Lavalin. In fact recieved orders from them how to do it and when. At Davos.

    Corruption at its finest.

    And the best is Trudeau trying to deflect it. But it's already stuck.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  11. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by The Oracle View Post
    LMAO.........That's your take eh?
    Its fact, all he wanted was for SNC charges to be handled via DPA. The laws are on the books. The is nothing in the law that states what is or isn't eligable for DPA.

  12. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by nottyboi View Post
    Its fact, all he wanted was for SNC charges to be handled via DPA. The laws are on the books. The is nothing in the law that states what is or isn't eligable for DPA.
    And who exactly was the law created for?

    Changing the law for a donor is the height of corruption. Especially when they tell you how and when to do it.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  13. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler1000 View Post
    They actually changed the law specifically to help SNC Lavalin. In fact recieved orders from them how to do it and when. At Davos.

    Corruption at its finest.

    And the best is Trudeau trying to deflect it. But it's already stuck.
    Who says it was for SNC, the law is still on the books and can be used for any case. The SNC case may have been an obvious one but it is not just for SNC. Its also similar to laws on the books of several other G7 countries.

  14. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler1000 View Post
    It's a great clear cut scandal that clearly shows Trudeau lied on transparency and accountability. And is continuing Liberal party corruption.

    Taking the side of a bribing Multi National corporation? Who has also done the same on domestic Construction contracts as well?

    How Neo liberal of you.
    Every western nation has had it corporations pay bribes in corrupt foreign govts, only Canadians would be dumb enough to suggest its worth destroying one of their top companies over. Its like the Ben Johnson scandal at a corporate level.

  15. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by nottyboi View Post
    Who says it was for SNC, the law is still on the books and can be used for any case. The SNC case may have been an obvious one but it is not just for SNC. Its also similar to laws on the books of several other G7 countries.
    Um, the fact they did it in time for their trial and recieved papers at Davos from the CEO how to do it?

    The law should be removed. First they made corporations people under the law so CEOs couldn't be held liable. Now they want to stop holding corporations liable by allowing them to buy their way out.

    That's corruption to a T
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  16. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by nottyboi View Post
    Every western nation has had it corporations pay bribes in corrupt foreign govts, only Canadians would be dumb enough to suggest its worth destroying one of their top companies over. Its like the Ben Johnson scandal at a corporate level.
    And you suggest allowing a corrupt corporate culture to continue to be rewarded.

    Next it will be polluters. And onwards.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

  17. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butler1000 View Post
    Why would you defend a corporation that has used bribery both domestically and internationally to circumvent the bidding process?

    You are, quite simply, condoning and encouraging corruption by supporting SNC Lavalin. There is no two ways about it.

    No, I don't believe it will cost jobs. Those employees can find other employment. It will however allow other companies to be created to fill the gap.
    So Siemens did exactly the same thing and they were fined in both Germany and The USA. It is business as usual for them in Canada. Are they going through any sanctions in Canada? Not really. But it is okay for them to do so and then it is business as usual globally, but you and the right wingers want a Canadian Company to pay the huge price with sanctions etc, especially when their CEO and others have already been charged and are serving their sentences. What is wrong with paying the price with a fine and then going on with business as usual?? This is not called "condoning", as a fine and sentences to the CEO and others involved are no longer in the Organization.

    Of course it will cost some jobs, and it could benefit foreign companies who may have to fill in the gap, as not all Canadian Companies can do so!!

    http://theconversation.com/lessons-f...e-later-108694

    https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/canada-s...dier-1.1174297


    On ignore: Disrespectful Individuals!!

  18. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by bver_hunter View Post
    So Siemens did exactly the same thing and they were fined in both Germany and The USA. It is business as usual for them in Canada. Are they going through any sanctions in Canada? Not really. But it is okay for them to do so and then it is business as usual globally, but you and the right wingers want a Canadian Company to pay the huge price with sanctions etc, especially when their CEO and others have already been charged and are serving their sentences. What is wrong with paying the price with a fine and then going on with business as usual?? This is not called "condoning", as a fine and sentences to the CEO and others involved are no longer in the Organization.

    Of course it will cost some jobs, and it could benefit foreign companies who may have to fill in the gap, as not all Canadian Companies can do so!!

    http://theconversation.com/lessons-f...e-later-108694

    https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/canada-s...dier-1.1174297
    So your answer is yes, happy to compromise principles for cash.
    I endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for President in 2020.

    It is my hope Tulsi Gabbard becomes his running mate.

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